Why Duke University gets so many applications

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Duke University was founded in 1838 in Trinity, North Carolina and later in 1892 moved to Durham, North Carolina. Duke University has a very rich history and is considered an Ivy League school. It is very difficult to get accepted into Duke University because their admissions are highly selective. As an example more than 32000 applications were submitted for the class of 2018 and only 10% were accepted.

Duke University is currently divided into 10 schools and colleges which span over 8,600 acres  on three contiguous campuses in Durham as well as a marine lab in Beaufort. Duke’s main campus—designed largely by architect Julian Abele—incorporates Gothic architecture with the 210-foot Duke Chapel at the campus’ center and highest point of elevation.

The graduate programs at Duke University include the highly ranked Fuqua School of Business, Pratt School of Engineering, School of Law, School of Medicine, Sanford School of Public Policy and School of Nursing. Duke also offers graduate programs through its well-respected Divinity School and Nicholas School of the Environment. 

It is not surprising that Duke Libraries are one of the nation’s top 10 private research library systems, includes the Perkins, Bostock, and Rubenstein Libraries on West Campus, the Lilly and Music Libraries on East Campus, the Pearse Memorial Library at the Duke Marine Lab, and the separately administered libraries serving the schools of business, divinity, law and medicine.

Duke also has the Nasher Museum of Art on Central Campus. The museum was designed by Rafael Viñoly and is named for Duke alumnus and art collector Raymond Nasher. The museum opened in 2005 at a cost of over $23 million and contains over 13,000 works of art making it another reason why so many students try to get into Duke University.

As a student you will be required to live on campus for the first three years of undergraduate life, except for a small percentage of second semester juniors who are exempted by a lottery system (85% of undergraduates live on campus). This requirement is justified by the administration as an effort to help students connect more closely with one another and sustain a sense of belonging within the Duke community.  

All freshmen are housed in one of 14 residences on East Campus. These buildings range in occupancy size from 50 (Epworth—the oldest residence hall, built in 1892 as “the Inn”) to 190 residents (Gilbert-Addoms). Most of these are in the Georgian style typical of the East Campus architecture. Although the newer residence halls differ in style, they still relate to East’s Georgian heritage. Learning communities connect the residential component of East Campus with students of similar academic and social interests. Similarly, students in FOCUS, a first-year program that features courses clustered around a specific theme, live together in the same residence hall as other students in their cluster.

Sophomores, juniors and seniors can choose to reside on either West or Central campuses, although the majority of undergraduate seniors choose to live off campus. West Campus contains six quadrangles—the four along “Main” West were built in 1930s, while two newer ones have since been added. Central Campus provides housing for over 1,000 students in apartment buildings. All housing on West and Central is organized into about 80 “houses”—sections of residence halls or clusters of apartments—to which students can return each year. go to Duke University

 



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